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Responding to Terrorist Threats: What You Can Do

homeland security advisory system

 

Current Threat Level: Yellow/Elevated

Learn more about threat levels from the Department of Homeland Security

 


FEMA's (Federal Emergency Management Agency) publication “Are You Ready? A Guide to Citizen Preparedness” offers specific protective measures that you can take for a "High Condition (Orange)" threat level.

These include:

  • Develop a household disaster plan – have a household meeting to discuss what members would do and how they would communicate in the event of an incident
  • Assemble a disaster supply kit with food, water, and first aid supplies at home, at work, and for your car
  • Be sure to have a battery operated radio and extra batteries to stay informed
  • Have a list of emergency contact numbers, including fire, police, and hospitals, near the phone
  • Review and practice evacuation plans
  • Learn about community sheltering resources and how to "shelter in place"
  • Check with school officials to determine their plans for emergency procedures
  • Apartment residents should discuss emergency procedures with building managers
  • Contact neighbors to discuss their plans and needs and how you can help each other
  • If you have special needs, be sure to discuss your plans with family, friends, and your employers
  • Be observant of any suspicious activity and report it to authorities
  • Avoid high profile or symbolic locations
  • Exercise caution when traveling
  • Schedule a course in first aid training and CPR and work with your local fire department, emergency managers, and law enforcement to help expand Community Emergency Response Training in your community

Are You Ready Guide

IMPORTANT!! If an event does happen, be sure to listen to what LOCAL AUTHORITIES tell you about the situation in your area.

Revised in September 2002, Are You Ready? provides a step-by-step outline on how to prepare a disaster supply kit, emergency planning for people with disabilities, how to locate and evacuate to a shelter, and even contingency planning for family pets. Man-made threats from hazardous materials and terrorism are also treated in detail.


Other Resources

Don't Be Afraid – Be Ready!

Visit www.ready.gov for information on how to best prepare for terrorist threats.

The Department of Homeland Security

And... don't forget the upcoming CAER Safety Fairs

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